top ALL ENDS IN SILENCE IN PASSCHENDAELE

ALL ENDS IN SILENCE IN PASSCHENDAELE
2021
150 (h) x 120 (w) x 2 cm
59,1 (h) x 47,2 (w) x 0,79 in
acrylic and oil on canvas
Coronavirus series

The Battle of Passchendaele (also known as Third Battle of Ypres) was a campaign of the First World War, fought by the attacking Allies (Belgian, French, British Expeditionary Force and Canadian Expeditionary Force) against the defensive German Empire, near the Belgian city of Ypres in West Flanders, from July to November 1917. Men went into battle because the politicians told them this was the decisive war that would end all wars. But nothing but horror and death awaited them. The battle ended with the conquest of the small village of Passchendaele, but there were hundreds of thousands of casualties in this offensive. More than 600,000 soldiers died here in just 100 days for a small shift of the front line. The campaign was controversial and has remained so. Especially the effect of the exceptional weather, the decision to continue the offensive in rainy October and the human costs of the battle are also debated. That is why the Flanders Offensive now stands for the brutality and senselessness of this war.

* * *

“This is a war to end all wars.”
~ Woodrow Wilson (President of the United States), 1917

As statements to counter President Woodrow Wilson's words:

"Only the dead have seen the end of war.”
~ George Santayana (Spanish author), 1922

“This war, like the next war, is a war to end war.”
~ David Lloyd George (British Prime Minister), 1917

* * *

About the background:

This painting is one of a monochrome series of current works that artistically deal with the subject of the coronavirus and the effects. There is an existential threat that is not exactly tangible, remains diffuse and yet dominates everything. What does this pandemic do to the individual? What will remain of this strangely depressing time? Sometimes a look at history helps. In modern history, how did previous generations deal with such dramatic episodes? And we understand, there were dramas of completely different dimensions that humans are able to cope with.

A war of annihilation raged around a hundred years ago (1914 - 1918) that set the entire world on fire and changed everyone: The First World War is the key event of the 20th century and is still having an impact today. The history books contain the names of the generals and the great battles. But what about the normal individual, the one in the trenches as well as the families who struggled for survival back home? How did you think, how did they feel in the midst of an existential threat that they had no control over?

The photos of the battlefields of the First World War, in particular the fighting on the Western Front in Flanders, before Verdun and on the Marne and Somme (between German, French, British, American, Belgian, Australian, New Zealand, Portuguese, and Canadian soldiers) formed the con-crete template for these paintings. The monochrome color scheme of the paintings, dominated by Prussian Blue, refers to the historical black and white photos. The letters that the soldiers at the front wrote back home are well documented. And anyone reading this field post today will notice that the men in the armies (and their families) thought and felt alike despite their opposition. And even more, how similar people were to us with all their hopes and fears at the beginning of the 20th century, more than we probably want to admit.

Today these battlefields have been renatured. The fields and forests are quiet and peaceful, and almost nothing gives an inkling of the earlier horror, the trenches, and mass armies that generated unprecedented destructive power with modern weapons. What determined the fate of millions of people is now only a fading memory. And this is exactly what the artworks in this series of paintings tell about. There is a fundamental insight: every horror has an end at some point. The chance to shape life individually and freely again will return. The coronavirus will only remain a temporary episode in all of our lives. And in a hundred years at the latest we won't even remember what is troubling us now, what caused it, whether it was good or bad, and whether it was a medical or a human disaster. The dark fades (too) quickly. Man is a survivor and always looks ahead. And that's how I want the paintings in this series to be understood, despite the difficult subject, as signs of firm hope.

top MARY MAGDALENE IN ECSTASY (AFTER CARAVAGGIO)

MARY MAGDALENE IN ECSTASY
(AFTER CARAVAGGIO)
2021
100 (h) x 120 (w) x 2 cm
39,4 (h) x 47,2 (w) x 0,79 in
acrylic and oil on canvas
Coronavirus series

Mary Magdalene was a strong woman and former sinner who, according to the four canonical gospels, traveled with Jesus as one of his followers and was a witness to his crucifixion and its aftermath. She is mentioned by name twelve times in the canonical gospels. The fascinating figure of Mary Magdalene was a popular artistic motif during the baroque and renaissance periods. The basis for my artwork is a baroque oil painting by the famous Italian painter Caravaggio with the title “Mary Magdalene in Ecstasy”, which was created in Rome in 1606. Impressed by this beautiful and passionate work, and as a personal response to the coronavirus and these difficult times, I decided on a contemporary, color-reduced reinterpretation of the motif.

* * * *

“The grief of this woman, whose life was changed by her personal encounter with Jesus, is the grief of us all, in our darkest moments.”
~ Pope Francis on Mary Magdalene

“Remember Mary Magdalene. If I become a Saint – I will surely be one of darkness. I will continually be absent from Heaven – to light the light of those in darkness on earth.”
~ Mother Teresa

top NO MAN’S LAND (quadriptych)

NO MAN’S LAND
Quadriptych 2021 (4 pieces)
Complete dimension with a hanging distance of 5 cm / 1,96 in between the 4 pieces:
hung as a square with 2 in a row: 65 (h) x 53 (w) x 2 cm / 25,6 (h) x 20,9 (w) x 0,79 in
hung side by side: 30 (h) x 111 (w) x 2 cm / 11,8 (h) x 43,7 (w) x 0,79 in
dimension of each piece 30 (h) x 24 (w) x 2 cm / 11,8 (h) x 9,44 (w) x 0,79 in
acrylic and oil on canvas
Coronavirus series

During World War I, No Man’s Land was both an actual and a metaphorical space. It separated the front lines of the opposing armies and it could also be the most terrifying of places; one that held the greatest danger for combatants. During nightfall each side would dispatch parties to spy on the enemy, or to repair or extend barbed wire posts. Reconnaissance missions were similarly com-mon. Injured men trapped in No Man's Land would often be brought in under cover of darkness, as were corpses for burial. Consequently artillery shelling of No Man's Land was common, quickly reducing it to a barren wasteland comprised of destroyed vegetation and mud-soaked craters.

* * *

“There was not a sign of life of any sort. Not a tree, save for a few dead stumps which looked strange in the moonlight. Not a bird, not even a rat or a blade of grass. Nature was dead. And death was written large everywhere.”
~ Private R.A. Colwell, Passchendaele, January 1918

“No Man’s Land was like the face of the moon, chaotic, crater-ridden, uninhabitable, awful, the abode of madness.”
~ Wilfried Owen

* * *

About the background:

This quadriptych is one of a monochrome series of current works that artistically deal with the subject of the coronavirus and the effects. There is an existential threat that is not exactly tangible, remains diffuse and yet dominates everything. What does this pandemic do to the individual? What will remain of this strangely depressing time? Sometimes a look at history helps. In modern history, how did previous generations deal with such dramatic episodes? And we understand, there were dramas of completely different dimensions that humans are able to cope with.

A war of annihilation raged around a hundred years ago (1914 - 1918) that set the entire world on fire and changed everyone: The First World War is the key event of the 20th century and is still having an impact today. The history books contain the names of the generals and the great battles. But what about the normal individual, the one in the trenches as well as the families who struggled for survival back home? How did you think, how did they feel in the midst of an existential threat that they had no control over?

The photos of the battlefields of the First World War, in particular the fighting on the Western Front in Flanders, before Verdun and on the Marne and Somme (between German, French, British, American, Belgian, Australian, New Zealand, Portuguese, and Canadian soldiers) formed the con-crete template for these paintings. The monochrome color scheme of the paintings, dominated by Prussian Blue, refers to the historical black and white photos. The letters that the soldiers at the front wrote back home are well documented. And anyone reading this field post today will notice that the men in the armies (and their families) thought and felt alike despite their opposition. And even more, how similar people were to us with all their hopes and fears at the beginning of the 20th century, more than we probably want to admit.

Today these battlefields have been renatured. The fields and forests are quiet and peaceful, and almost nothing gives an inkling of the earlier horror, the trenches, and mass armies that generated unprecedented destructive power with modern weapons. What determined the fate of millions of people is now only a fading memory. And this is exactly what the artworks in this series of paintings tell about. There is a fundamental insight: every horror has an end at some point. The chance to shape life individually and freely again will return. The coronavirus will only remain a temporary episode in all of our lives. And in a hundred years at the latest we won't even remember what is troubling us now, what caused it, whether it was good or bad, and whether it was a medical or a human disaster. The dark fades (too) quickly. Man is a survivor and always looks ahead. And that's how I want the paintings in this series to be understood, despite the difficult subject, as signs of firm hope.

top DAY AND NIGHT ON THE SOMME

DAY AND NIGHT ON THE SOMME
2021
120 (h) x 100 (w) x 4,5 cm
47,2 (h) x 39,4 (w) x 1,8 in
acrylic and oil on canvas
Coronavirus series

The Battle of the Somme lasted 141 days (1 July – 16 November 1916). Men went into battle because the politicians told them this was the decisive war that would end all wars. But nothing but horror and death awaited them. British casualties on the first day of this battle were the worst in the history of the British Army. In the United Kingdom and Newfoundland, the Battle of the Somme became the central memory of World War I, but in Germany, memories of this fight (and this war) have largely been pushed out of the public eye.

* * *

A German officer wrote home, 14 August 1916:
“Somme. The whole history of the world cannot contain a more ghastly word!”
~ Friedrich Steinbrecher (killed in action 1917)

* * *

About the background:

This painting is one of a monochrome series of current works that artistically deal with the subject of the coronavirus and the effects. There is an existential threat that is not exactly tangible, remains diffuse and yet dominates everything. What does this pandemic do to the individual? What will remain of this strangely depressing time? Sometimes a look at history helps. In modern history, how did previous generations deal with such dramatic episodes? And we understand, there were dramas of completely different dimensions that humans are able to cope with.

A war of annihilation raged around a hundred years ago (1914 - 1918) that set the entire world on fire and changed everyone: The First World War is the key event of the 20th century and is still having an impact today. The history books contain the names of the generals and the great battles. But what about the normal individual, the one in the trenches as well as the families who struggled for survival back home? How did you think, how did they feel in the midst of an existential threat that they had no control over?

The photos of the battlefields of the First World War, in particular the fighting on the Western Front in Flanders, before Verdun and on the Marne and Somme (between German, French, British, American, Belgian, Australian, New Zealand, Portuguese, and Canadian soldiers) formed the con-crete template for these paintings. The monochrome color scheme of the paintings, dominated by Prussian Blue, refers to the historical black and white photos. The letters that the soldiers at the front wrote back home are well documented. And anyone reading this field post today will notice that the men in the armies (and their families) thought and felt alike despite their opposition. And even more, how similar people were to us with all their hopes and fears at the beginning of the 20th century, more than we probably want to admit.

Today these battlefields have been renatured. The fields and forests are quiet and peaceful, and almost nothing gives an inkling of the earlier horror, the trenches, and mass armies that generated unprecedented destructive power with modern weapons. What determined the fate of millions of people is now only a fading memory. And this is exactly what the artworks in this series of paintings tell about. There is a fundamental insight: every horror has an end at some point. The chance to shape life individually and freely again will return. The coronavirus will only remain a temporary episode in all of our lives. And in a hundred years at the latest we won't even remember what is troubling us now, what caused it, whether it was good or bad, and whether it was a medical or a human disaster. The dark fades (too) quickly. Man is a survivor and always looks ahead. And that's how I want the paintings in this series to be understood, despite the difficult subject, as signs of firm hope.

top FLANDERS FIELDS IN EARLY WINTER (diptych)

FLANDERS FIELDS IN EARLY WINTER (diptych)
Diptych 2021
Complete dimension hung with a distance of 10 cm / 3,9 in:
80 (h) x 130 (w) x 2 cm / 31,5 (h) x 51,2 (w) x 0,79 in
each of the two parts 80 (h) x 60 (w) x 2 cm / 31,5 (h) x 23,6 (w) x 0,79 in
acrylic and oil on canvas
Coronavirus series

Flanders Fields is a common English name of the World War I battlefields in an area straddling the Belgian provinces of West Flanders and East Flanders. "In Flanders Fields" is also a war poem, written during the First World War by Canadian physician Lieutenant-Colonel John McCrae. He was inspired to write it on May 3, 1915, after presiding over the funeral his friend, who died in the Second Battle of Ypres. It is one of the most quoted poems from the war. Its references to the red poppies that grew over the graves of fallen soldiers resulted in the remembrance poppy becoming one of the world's most recognized memorial symbols for soldiers who have died in conflict.

* * * *

“In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row…
We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.”

~ John McCrae, May 3, 1915 (ex: “In Flanders Fields”)

* * * *

“Never think that war, no matter how necessary, nor how justified, is not a crime.”
~ Ernest Hemingway, 1946
Hemingway was 18 years old when he volunteered to be an ambulance driver for WWI. He suffered physically and mentally from the horrors of war. As a novelist, he used his writing to show the criminality of the war.

* * * *

About the background:

This diptych is one of a monochrome series of current works that artistically deal with the subject of the coronavirus and the effects. There is an existential threat that is not exactly tangible, remains diffuse and yet dominates everything. What does this pandemic do to the individual? What will remain of this strangely depressing time? Sometimes a look at history helps. In modern history, how did previous generations deal with such dramatic episodes? And we understand, there were dramas of completely different dimensions that humans are able to cope with.

A war of annihilation raged around a hundred years ago (1914 - 1918) that set the entire world on fire and changed everyone: The First World War is the key event of the 20th century and is still having an impact today. The history books contain the names of the generals and the great battles. But what about the normal individual, the one in the trenches as well as the families who struggled for survival back home? How did you think, how did they feel in the midst of an existential threat that they had no control over?

The photos of the battlefields of the First World War, in particular the fighting on the Western Front in Flanders, before Verdun and on the Marne and Somme (between German, French, British, American, Belgian, Australian, New Zealand, Portuguese, and Canadian soldiers) formed the con-crete template for these paintings. The monochrome color scheme of the paintings, dominated by Prussian Blue, refers to the historical black and white photos. The letters that the soldiers at the front wrote back home are well documented. And anyone reading this field post today will notice that the men in the armies (and their families) thought and felt alike despite their opposition. And even more, how similar people were to us with all their hopes and fears at the beginning of the 20th century, more than we probably want to admit.

Today these battlefields have been renatured. The fields and forests are quiet and peaceful, and almost nothing gives an inkling of the earlier horror, the trenches, and mass armies that generated unprecedented destructive power with modern weapons. What determined the fate of millions of people is now only a fading memory. And this is exactly what the artworks in this series of paintings tell about. There is a fundamental insight: every horror has an end at some point. The chance to shape life individually and freely again will return. The coronavirus will only remain a temporary episode in all of our lives. And in a hundred years at the latest we won't even remember what is troubling us now, what caused it, whether it was good or bad, and whether it was a medical or a human disaster. The dark fades (too) quickly. Man is a survivor and always looks ahead. And that's how I want the paintings in this series to be understood, despite the difficult subject, as signs of firm hope.

top ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT

ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT
2021
50 (w) x 40 (h) x 0,3 cm
19,7 (w) x 15,7 (h) x 0,12 in
acrylic and oil on canvas board
Coronavirus series

“All Quiet on the Western Front“ is an international bestseller and famous anti-war novel by Erich Maria Remarque, a German veteran of World War I. The book describes the German soldiers' extreme physical and mental stress during the war, and the detachment from civilian life felt by many of these soldiers upon returning home from the front. The novel was first published in 1929. The book was banned and burned in Nazi Germany. In 1930, the book was adapted as an Academy-Award-winning film of the same name, directed by Lewis Milestone.

* * *

“We have so much to say, and we shall never say it.”
“He fell in October 1918, on a day that was so quiet and still on the whole front, that the army report confined itself to the single sentence: All quiet on the Western Front.”

~ Erich Maria Remarque (ex: All Quiet on the Western Front)

* * *

About the background:

This painting is one of a monochrome series of current works that artistically deal with the subject of the coronavirus and the effects. There is an existential threat that is not exactly tangible, remains diffuse and yet dominates everything. What does this pandemic do to the individual? What will remain of this strangely depressing time? Sometimes a look at history helps. In modern history, how did previous generations deal with such dramatic episodes? And we understand, there were dramas of completely different dimensions that humans are able to cope with.

A war of annihilation raged around a hundred years ago (1914 - 1918) that set the entire world on fire and changed everyone: The First World War is the key event of the 20th century and is still having an impact today. The history books contain the names of the generals and the great battles. But what about the normal individual, the one in the trenches as well as the families who struggled for survival back home? How did you think, how did they feel in the midst of an existential threat that they had no control over?

The photos of the battlefields of the First World War, in particular the fighting on the Western Front in Flanders, before Verdun and on the Marne and Somme (between German, French, British, American, Belgian, Australian, New Zealand, Portuguese, and Canadian soldiers) formed the con-crete template for these paintings. The monochrome color scheme of the paintings, dominated by Prussian Blue, refers to the historical black and white photos. The letters that the soldiers at the front wrote back home are well documented. And anyone reading this field post today will notice that the men in the armies (and their families) thought and felt alike despite their opposition. And even more, how similar people were to us with all their hopes and fears at the beginning of the 20th century, more than we probably want to admit.

Today these battlefields have been renatured. The fields and forests are quiet and peaceful, and almost nothing gives an inkling of the earlier horror, the trenches, and mass armies that generated unprecedented destructive power with modern weapons. What determined the fate of millions of people is now only a fading memory. And this is exactly what the artworks in this series of paintings tell about. There is a fundamental insight: every horror has an end at some point. The chance to shape life individually and freely again will return. The coronavirus will only remain a temporary episode in all of our lives. And in a hundred years at the latest we won't even remember what is troubling us now, what caused it, whether it was good or bad, and whether it was a medical or a human disaster. The dark fades (too) quickly. Man is a survivor and always looks ahead. And that's how I want the paintings in this series to be understood, despite the difficult subject, as signs of firm hope.

top LANGEMARCK IN NOVEMBER

LANGEMARCK IN NOVEMBER
Diptych 2021
Complete dimension with a hanging distance of 5 cm / 1,96 in between the two pieces:
hung below each other: 45 (h) x 50 (w) x 2 cm / 17,7 (h) x 19,7 (w) x 0,78 in
hung side by side: 20 (h) x 105 (w) x 2 cm / 7,9 (h) x 41,3 (w) x 0,78 in
dimension of each piece 20 (h) x 50 (w) x 2 cm / 7,9 (h) x 19,7 (w) x 0,78 in
acrylic and oil on canvas
Coronavirus series

Langemarck is a village in the Belgian province of West-Flanders, and known as an important battlefield of World War I., on 10 November 1914, in the first months of a war that would then last four years, during an attempted breakthrough, the German corps suffered enormous losses: over 2,000 young soldiers (some only 15 years old), led by young officers without practical experience, died without achieving any objective. They were senselessly sacrificed by the army leadership. But the German propaganda misused this tragedy. A popular and enduring myth of heroic self-sacrifice for the nation known as the "Mythos von Langemarck" arose from the propagandistic lying story. But in reality the story of the young soldiers before Langemarck is an extreme example of the futility and absurdity of war and that in every war the truth dies first. There is now a major German war cemetery, the Langemark German war cemetery, in this location, which has about 40,000 burials.

* * *

“Two armies that fight each other is like one large army that commits suicide.”
~ Henri Barbusse, 1916

* * *

About the background:

This diptych is one of a monochrome series of current works that artistically deal with the subject of the coronavirus and the effects. There is an existential threat that is not exactly tangible, remains diffuse and yet dominates everything. What does this pandemic do to the individual? What will remain of this strangely depressing time? Sometimes a look at history helps. In modern history, how did previous generations deal with such dramatic episodes? And we understand, there were dramas of completely different dimensions that humans are able to cope with.

A war of annihilation raged around a hundred years ago (1914 - 1918) that set the entire world on fire and changed everyone: The First World War is the key event of the 20th century and is still having an impact today. The history books contain the names of the generals and the great battles. But what about the normal individual, the one in the trenches as well as the families who struggled for survival back home? How did you think, how did they feel in the midst of an existential threat that they had no control over?

The photos of the battlefields of the First World War, in particular the fighting on the Western Front in Flanders, before Verdun and on the Marne and Somme (between German, French, British, American, Belgian, Australian, New Zealand, Portuguese, and Canadian soldiers) formed the con-crete template for these paintings. The monochrome color scheme of the paintings, dominated by Prussian Blue, refers to the historical black and white photos. The letters that the soldiers at the front wrote back home are well documented. And anyone reading this field post today will notice that the men in the armies (and their families) thought and felt alike despite their opposition. And even more, how similar people were to us with all their hopes and fears at the beginning of the 20th century, more than we probably want to admit.

Today these battlefields have been renatured. The fields and forests are quiet and peaceful, and almost nothing gives an inkling of the earlier horror, the trenches, and mass armies that generated unprecedented destructive power with modern weapons. What determined the fate of millions of people is now only a fading memory. And this is exactly what the artworks in this series of paintings tell about. There is a fundamental insight: every horror has an end at some point. The chance to shape life individually and freely again will return. The coronavirus will only remain a temporary episode in all of our lives. And in a hundred years at the latest we won't even remember what is troubling us now, what caused it, whether it was good or bad, and whether it was a medical or a human disaster. The dark fades (too) quickly. Man is a survivor and always looks ahead. And that's how I want the paintings in this series to be understood, despite the difficult subject, as signs of firm hope.

top WHAT IF I FELL IN LOVE WITH YOU (diptych)

WHAT IF I FELL IN LOVE WITH YOU (diptych)
Diptych 2020
150 (h) x 260 (w) x 2 cm
59,1 (h) x 102,36 (w) x 0,79 in
acrylic and oil on canvas

LARGE STATEMENT PIECE
LARGE-SCALED DIPTYCH

What if I fell in love with you? A long time ago. In this place under the bridge, in this place without a name, when every word seemed too much, trapped somewhere between spring and summer, what if I had loved you then? No ifs or buts, just before the rain came and before the night ended, what if I fell in love with you then?...

Over the years, the cycle of life became an important topic in my painting. I'm not talking about the big events and actions. Life is always a collection of many little moments and key experiences. What do we remember when we look back? It is not the complete story of our life from A to Z, it is just a few important breathtaking moments that have shaped and enriched us. Life is a circle and follows the course of the sun: We awaken, we rise, we take a deep breath before we fall and fade again. In this specific artwork I deal with our inner restlessness and longing that sometimes makes it so difficult for us to remain in the moment and enjoy happiness.

This diptych combines the following works and should be "read" from left to right:


*

I WOKE TO THE SOUND OF RAIN I
2020. acrylic and oil on canvas
120 (w) x 150 (h) x 2 cm
47,2 (w) x 59,1 (h) x 0,79 in
left part of the triptych

*

I WOKE TO THE SOUND OF RAIN II
2020. acrylic and oil on canvas
120 (w) x 150 (h) x 2 cm
47,2 (w) x 59,1 (h) x 0,79 in
right part of the triptych

* * * *

“I'm selfish, impatient and a little insecure. I make mistakes, I am out of control and at times hard to handle. But if you can't handle me at my worst, then you sure as hell don't deserve me at my best.”
~ Marilyn Monroe

“Love is like the wind, you can't see it but you can feel it.”
~ Nicholas Sparks (ex: A Walk to Remember)

top THE SLEEPLESS LONGING FOR THE DISTANT (triptych)

THE SLEEPLESS LONGING FOR THE DISTANT (triptych)
Triptych 2020
150 (h) x 380 (w) x 4,5 cm
59,1 (h) x 149,6 (w) x 1,77 in
acrylic and oil on canvas

LARGE-SIZED STATEMENT PIECE
LARGE-SIZED TRILOGY AS TRIPTYCH

Over the years, the cycle of life became an important topic in my painting. I'm not talking about the big events and actions. Life is always a collection of many little moments and key experiences. What do we remember when we look back? It is not the complete story of our life from A to Z, it is just a few important breathtaking moments that have shaped and enriched us. Life is a circle and follows the course of the sun: We awaken, we rise, we take a deep breath before we fall and fade again. In this specific artwork I deal with our inner restlessness and longing that sometimes makes it so difficult for us to remain in the moment and enjoy happiness. This triptych combines the following works and should be "read" from left to right:

*

AS FAR AS THE CURRENTS CARRY ME
2020. acrylic and oil on canvas
120 (w) x 150 (h) x 4,5 cm
47,2 (w) x 59,1 (h) x 1,77 inches
left part of the triptych

*

TEARS FROM DIFFERENT SKIES FILL THE OCEAN
2020. acrylic and oil on canvas
120 (w) x 150 (h) x 4,5 cm
47,2 (w) x 59,1 (h) x 1,77 inches
middle part of the triptych

*

FROM ONE END OF THE WORLD TO THE OTHER
2020. acrylic and oil on canvas
120 (w) x 150 (h) x 4,5 cm
47,2 (w) x 59,1 (h) x 1,77 inches
right part of the triptych

* * * *

"There is not one big cosmic meaning for all, there is only the meaning we each give to our life, an individual meaning, an individual plot, like an individual novel, a book for each person."
~ Anais Nin (1903 - 1977)

top AND YOUR NAME HAS LONG BEEN FORGOTTEN

AND YOUR NAME HAS LONG BEEN FORGOTTEN
2020
120 (h) x 120 (w) x 2 cm
47,2 (h) x 47,2 (w) x 0,79 in
acrylic and oil on canvas

Color-reduced, monochrome painting in Prussian and Phtalo blue, inspired by the picturesque poetry of traditional Japanese and Chinese ink drawings. About the thematic background of the painting:

I remember
As if it was yesterday
Your childlike laugh
The warm summer rain
That washed my words away.

I do not remember
Who you were, I was
And my bittersweet heart
Home above the storm clouds
Has long forgotten your name.

CB/2020

* * * *

"Only longing can fill with more of itself."
~ Virgina Woolf